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Winter Cycling in Central Oregon – Bust Out the Fat Bike

15 min read

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When the snow starts to fly in Central Oregon, cyclists rejoice. No, not because they’re looking forward to some time off after a spring, summer and fall shredding the trails. They’re stoked because winter means fat bike season and some of the best riding of the year.

Fat Bikes are the next “big thing” in cycling – in fact, some folks are riding fat bikes or “plus sized” bikes year round. They’re comfy, they can tackle any terrain and quite honestly, they look kind of bad-ass.

Salem Statesman Journal outdoor writer Zach Urness headed out for a ride last year in the snowy Central Oregon backcountry and had a blast.

“The best part of riding on snow, at least when the snow is groomed or packed down, is that it feels pretty much like riding on pavement, gravel, or dirt. Four-inch-wide tires make the ride feel almost soft, as though you’re floating on pillows.”

You can read his essay in full here from our content partner the Outdoor Project.

Interested in giving fat biking a try? Stop by The Hub Cyclery in Downtown Bend and talk to the owner TJ. He’s a fat bike enthusiast and can get you hooked up with a bike and some great spots to ride. You can also find rentals and expertise at Pine Mountain Sports and Hutch’s Bicycles in Bend and Redmond.

Cog Wild Mountain Bike Tours and Shuttles is also a great place to turn for winter fat biking. Their guides started offering fat bike tours last winter and they were a hit. Even more tour options are expected in 2015/2016.

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Ted Taylor
Ted Taylor
Ted Taylor manages COVA's digital content, media relations, PR and social media. He's an award-winning reporter and editor who has worked in newspaper and televisions newsrooms in Nebraska, Colorado, Arkansas and Oregon. A former assistant golf professional, Ted still loves to sneak in a quick 9, but you're more likely these days to find him on the mountain bike trails when he's not spending time with his family. He's called Bend home for 17 years.